Lebanon unites against government corruption – Terror fans burn US, Israeli flags

Lebanon unites against government corruption - Terror fans burn US, Israeli flags

Lebanese terror fans who have been protesting against lack of jobs and government corruption along with many other Lebanese over the past days, burned US and Israeli flags because there is no Arab protest without a burning flag ceremony.

Hezbollah-linked media is promoting the images of protesters rallying against domestic political corruption in the densely populated cities of Soor and Nabatieh, while performing the traditional ceremony of stepping on and burning the Israeli and American flags.

 

Lebanon unites against government corruption and terror fans burn US, Israeli flags (2) Lebanon unites against government corruption and terror fans burn US, Israeli flags (3)

Lebanon unites against government corruption and terror fans burn US, Israeli flags (4)Lebanon unites against government corruption and terror fans burn US, Israeli flags

Hundreds of thousands have taken to the streets across the country for anti-government protests, paralyzing its economy and blindsiding its government.

These are the largest demonstrations the country has seen since March 2005, when mass protests ended a decades-long Syrian military presence in the country. Sparked by a proposed tax on WhatsApp calls, the protests began in earnest Thursday night with demonstrators forcing road closures around the country.

Widespread corruption and government mismanagement chipped away at the country’s resources. Around a third of the country lives under the poverty line, according to the World Bank, although the country is considered an upper-middle-income country.

The government approved an ambitious program that slashes officials’ salaries by 50%, levies large taxes on banks’ profits, scraps further austerity proposals and seeks to stem big financial losses in the electricity sector, along with other reform measures.

The budget could unlock billions of dollars in pledged international donations, possibly offering the country a reprieve from its deep-seated economic problems.

But the reforms did not appear to appease protesters, reinforcing what many of them have been saying over the past five days. Trust in the governance of political elites has collapsed. People on Lebanon’s streets do not believe the government has the wherewithal to implement its plans.