Israeli orphans face Muslim terrorist who murdered their parents at Jewish Museum in Brussels

The young daughters of an Israeli couple gunned down at the Jewish Museum in Belgium came face to face with the Muslim terrorist who murdered their parents.

Speaking Hebrew quietly through an interpreter at the Brussels criminal court, Shira and Ayalet Riva — who were aged 17 and 15 when Emanuel and Miriam Riva were shot at point-blank range in a terror attack on May 24, 2014 — spoke of two devoted parents who were in the Belgian capital on vacation to mark their wedding anniversary.

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Before they entered the court, family photos of the girls with their parents on various vacations and in their home were projected on a screen for the jury.

“Our lives have completely changed. Parties, birthdays, everything is different. Nothing is like it was,” said Ayalet, seated at a desk a few meters from the revolver used to shoot her parents in the back of the head at the entrance to the Jewish Museum in Brussels.

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“We live alone. We have to take care of ourselves alone. Even if we get help from the family, we still take care of ourselves alone,” she said.

To her right, the Muslim terrorist flanked by police officers wearing ski masks, sat impassively and barely looked at the women as they testified.

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French jihadi Mehdi Nemmouche, 33, who spent time in Syria with ISIS terrorists, is charged with “terrorist murder”.  Muslim terrorist Nacer Bendrer, 30, was also in court for supplying the weapons used in the murders.

Nemmouche’s lawyers have said he was a patsy coerced into transporting the weapons used in the attack “by the real killers, agents from the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad”.

At first too upset to answer the presiding judge’s questions about how they learned of their parents’ deaths and of their lives since, Shira eventually said that “day to day, things are very difficult.”

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“We try to support each other as much as we can,” she told the court. “Our lives will go on, but this tragedy will always be with us.”

Emanuel Riva’s twin brother, Arieh, also testified.

“I have never known life without him. We were born together. He was the eldest, born 5 minutes before me,” Arieh said of his sibling. “We were always in touch. We spoke at least once a week. We knew everything about each other.”

The trial is scheduled to run until March 1.

On 24 May 2014, Muslim terrorist Mehdi Nemmouche wearing a cap, carrying several bags and armed with a handgun and a Kalashnikov rifle arrived at the Jewish Museum of Belgium and opened fire, murdering three people on site and critically wounding a fourth, who died of his injuries on 6 June.

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According to security camera footage, the terrorist appeared to wear a baseball-type cap covering-up his head, and a chest-mounted camera, like Muslim terrorist Mohammed Merah, who filmed his terror attacks during the 2012 Toulouse and Montauban massacres, although it was stated that the camera failed during filming.

On 30 May 2014, Nemmouche, a French national of Algerian origin, was arrested in Marseille.

A group of French journalists kidnapped and held hostage by ISIS have identified Nemmouche as one of their jailers and accused him of torture.

They also named as one of their guards Belgian Najim Laachraoui, who investigators say built the suicide vests used in the 2015 Paris attack and was one of two suicide bombers who attacked Brussels airport four months later.