Canada revokes citizenship of 94-year-old last known Nazi living in Canada

Nearly a quarter-century after he was first notified that his Canadian citizenship would be revoked, Helmut Oberlander — the last known Nazi living in Canada found to be complicit in war crimes during the Second World War — could finally face deportation to Germany following a recent Federal Court ruling.

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In June 2017, the government revoked the Nazi retired businessman’s citizenship for the fourth time since the mid-1990s, prompting his current effort to turn to the courts in a bid to stave off deportation. To date, however, Oberlander has succeeded three times in challenging the government, creating precedents in the process.

The Ukraine-born Nazi, who came to Canada in the 1950s, has steadfastly maintained he was just 17 when forced on pain of execution to join the Nazi death squad Einsatzkommando 10a, known as Ek 10a. The squad was responsible for killing close to 100,000 Jews during the war.

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“I wrote about that Nazi in 2016. He participated with his murder battalion in the destruction of the Jews of Russia and Ukraine. He always tries to say, ‘I was only an interpreter in this battalion,'” Shimon Briman, a historian of Ukrainian origin said.

Last August, a 95-year-old former Nazi SS death camp guard was deported from his home in Queens, N.Y.

After World War II, Jakiw Palij hid his involvement in the slaughter of Jews at the Trawniki Polish death camp and gained entry to the US by claiming he was a farmer and factory worker.

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  1. October 3, 2018

    […] Canada revokes citizenship of 94-year-old last known Nazi living in Canada: […]

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